No 2nd chance in Macau

“At this Guia circuit Experience and skills are very important. It’s different from other tracks, Which are artificial race tracks.
You can still come back after you made a mistake, No second chance in Macau. Winning proves your ability. No fluke.
Some ask ‘why was I not fast on the last few laps?’ or ‘I was being chased down on the uphill sector?’ I say To win the race best lap is not important, no point being fast, but don’t see the checker flag. Harder you push, more risk and make mistakes. Simply said,
I was confident As long as I pass the first corner with no incident I was sure to control the race rhythm. That was my attitude. Lower pace on the uphill, no one can pass me, so I won’t risk it on the uphill. Everyone aims for Macau Grand Prix. This circuit is very difficult and filled with excitement. It’s the second most difficult circuit in the world. To me you have yet to prove yourself, if you have not won at Macau. Winning at this circuit, is a prove you’re a real winner” – Chou Keng Kuan, from Macau Fu Lei Loi Racing Team

Absolutely. That is the technique a lot of racers use on this course. It’s the same technique that Kazuo Shimizu used to win the 34th Macau GP in 1987.

The Cabin Civic and Trampio Civic make appearances in this videos:

Unlike other race courses, mistakes can not be made up at Macau. That’s what attracts me to this circuit, it’s the same race condition as street racing. Definitely a course I would like to drive on.

A more in car view of Macau seen here:

That sound.

Based on a true story… Many years ago…

A man is driving down the road and his car breaks down near a monastery. He goes to the monastery, knocks on the door, and says, “My car broke down. Do you think I could stay the night?” The monks graciously accept him, feed him dinner, tow his car to the monastery and even fix it.

As the man tries to fall asleep, he hears a strange sound. A sound unlike anything he’s ever heard before. The sound is very peaceful and healing. He doesn’t sleep that night. Instead he stays up studying the sound. Measuring the rhythm… It’s almost as if he can measure the hertz as well…

The next morning, he asks the monks what the sound was, but they say, “We can’t tell you. You’re not a monk.” His car gets fixed and the man leaves. Years later, after never being able to forget that sound, the man goes back to the monastery and asks for the answer again. The monks reply, “We can’t tell you. You’re not a monk.” The man says, “If the only way I can find out what is making that beautiful sound is to become a monk, then please, make me a monk.” The monks reply, “You must travel the earth and tell us how many blades of grass there are and the exact number of grains of sand. When you find these answers, you will have become a monk.” The man sets about his task.

After years of searching, it is now present day. He returns and knocks on the door of the monastery. A monk answers. He is taken before a gathering of all the monks. “In my quest to find what makes that beautiful sound, I traveled the earth and have found what you asked for: By design, the world is in a state of perpetual change. Only the Universe knows what you ask. All a man can know is himself, and only then if he is honest and reflective and willing to strip away self deception.” The monks reply, “Congratulations. You have become a monk. We shall now show you the way to the mystery of the sacred sound.”

The monks lead the man to a wooden door, where the head monk says, “The sound is beyond that door.” The monks give him the key, and he opens the door. Behind the wooden door is another door made of stone. The man is given the key to the stone door and he opens it, only to find a door made of ruby. And so it went that he needed keys to doors of emerald, pearl and diamond. Finally, they come to a door made of solid gold. The sound has become very clear and definite. The monks say, “This is the last key to the last door.” His life’s wish is behind that door. With trembling hands, he unlocks the door, turns the knob, and slowly pushes the door open. Finally he is utterly amazed to discover the source of that peaceful sound… But, of course, I can’t tell you what it is because you’re not a monk.

An ultimate sacrifice

When Siddhartha left his son and wife to find the Noble truth and ultimate wisdom of the world, some people looked at it as irresponsible. But no, he made the biggest sacrifice in the world. For you cutting ties with friends and “family” is the biggest sacrifice you can ever make. Some times the situation is in a matter which you have to cut out specific people in life. Whether it’s for a greater good or if it’s because they are toxic. Life is change. All we can do is adapt. The outcome of Siddhartha’s sacrifice lead him to become the Buddha. What will your sacrifice lead you to?

This is P. Runner, and these are my thoughts.

[12:28AM]

Macau: Guia Circuit

Guia Circuit, the home to the Macau Touring Car Race, GP & Moto GP. Background info found here.

Thoughts:

Whether you’re watching Kazuhiro (Osaka JDM), Joe (Car Make Across), Temple, the Sharks of NGR or members of Zero Fighter 555, you can see the kanjozoku spirit in their driving. With no street circuits in Japan, I can only imagine that street circuit racing like this is what the kanjozoku’s dreamed of back in the golden age of Japanese car culture. Of course they eventually made Loop 1 their street circuit.

Seeing that this circuit is in China, I feel that it was these type of races on street circuits that inspired HK movies like Off Track (1991).

When I watch races on Guia circuit, I find very similar mannerisms of a kanjozoku; the erratic and abrupt maneuvers to over take the opponent. Just watching the starting grid is like watching a bunch of fighter planes about to take off, and soon after take off is when the dog fights begin.

Disecting Guia:
The first turn on Guia

Leading onto the first straight away.

Turn 2, Mandarin Corner. Many take this turn at high speed so that they can over take at Lisboa.

The infamous Lisboa corner… Watch any race on this circuit. There will be either spinouts and/or pileups on this turn.

San Francisco Hill, an up hill stretch. I always liked the name because if you ever been to the city of San Francisco, CA, there are many steep hills such as this one (even more steeper actually).

A good exit speed and torque is your best friend here.

A down hill look of San Francisco

After San Francisco is a S-turn that leads to a 90 degree right hand turn

Then it’s a down hill stretch

Which leads to a series of turns that get narrow and as slithery as a snake.

Just wide enough for two cars… Leaving little to no room for mistakes.

Melco hairpin

Rules state, absolutely no passing at this hairpin… But I swore I seen people pass here before 🤔

Supposedly it’s only during Moto GP races that passing is allowed at this section.

Fisherman’s Bend, second to the last turn of the track which leads to a medium length straight away.

R- Bend, the last turn before the finish line.

Final Thoughts:

Even though many different divisions race here, I feel this is where Touring Car racing belong. When ever I think of this track I automatically picture cars of the touring races in the late 90′ to early 2000’s battling it out. I see the starting grid and I imagine the Kanjozoku’s lining up at the entrance of Loop 1. You don’t need crazy aero on your car when you race on this course, just skills.

It’s the swarm of noise, violent driving and the car pileups that echos nostalgia. It’s more exciting than the rat race of life and death we witness everyday in traffic and daily commutes.

You can find many videos of these older to current races online. When I watch them, I can almost picture myself there, maybe on of a high rise hotel suite watching from a birds eye view. Sipping on a martini or something haha, one day.

“There aren’t many places that make Monaco look easy, but Macau is one of them.”

[1:55 AM]

Road Trip Runner

As a car builder I’ve come to the conclusion that for me personally, I want my car to be the one that can do it all. I want it to be able to handle being driven hard at the track, hold it’s own on the street, look good at the local car meets, yet stay practical enough to take to the store for a quick errand. Looking at my current car, I tend to ask myself all the time “what do I want to use it for?”
In the more recent years, I’ve gotten into traveling. Something about seeing new places, new sights, traveling a far distance from home, it’s always an exciting feeling. But if you are a driver, you know that it isn’t just the destination that is significant, it’s the journey to it as well. What better way to enjoy that journey than in your “fun car?”

So here it is, I’m going to put my car to the test. I’m going to take it on a 1400 mile road trip. After inspecting everything I could in the Private Runner garage and a few last minute tweaks, “ Daphne”was as ready as she ever would be. The drive began at 2 AM. The travel crew and I (yes we were a full car, plus luggage) enjoyed the cool night air for the first few hours. LA was our first main city to pass through and besides the occasional launch out of the seat due to the uneven freeway, we were all good.

A few more hours past and finally we were seeing the glorious structure of the Bay Bridge up ahead. This was surely a sign of victory! Of course it isn’t enough to just get to the destination, it was now time to explore it. Speaking from experience, navigating a lowered car through SF was a challenge. Many scrapes and hits, but we conquered. And of course had to document this in pictures.

On the way back down, we past through Santa Cruz for a quick stop. The drive there was awesome for a fun car, definitely beats having a rental on the twisty stuff. It was also a bonus that everywhere we went, we always had great parking spots. VIP status for sure. After walking the boardwalk, we got back in the car for the last long stretch home.

We got back down to SoCal just in time to make a pit stop for some Boba at 7leaves. Really good spot to go to for some fresh tea. Just enough caffeine to fuel me for the rest of the drive home.

Was it worth it? Taking the Civic on a road trip like that? All the wear and tear? Well for starters, I’m not one to care about keeping the mileage low on a car. It’s a car, that’s what you’re supposed to do with it: drive it! Of course, a 90’s civic hatch slammed with no AC or tint isn’t the most comfy ride for a long trip but knowing that the car that I’ve built and maintained with my own hands, as well as with the help of good friends, can successfully complete such a trip with no fuss… and in addition getting props from people along the way who have no idea the distance the car has traveled… I’d say hell yeah it’s totally worth. Put some miles on your builds, folks!

– Words by PVT Runner I. Delos Santos